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Equation Editor in Google Presentation

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In Google Docs there is an equation editor that allows for users to insert math symbols into the document.  Unfortunately there is not an equation editor for Google Presentation.

A work around is Daum Equation Editor, a Chrome App that will launch in the Chrome web browser.

The Daum Equation editor works like most equation editors, a variety of templates for fractions, radicals, symbols and more.  After creating your equation, in the bottom right hand corner is an option to Save as Image.

On my Mac the Save as Image option does not add the .jpg file extension which is necessary to make the image file work.  Simply type .jpg at the end of the file name.

I save the image files onto my desktop so that I can drag the images directly from the desktop into the Google Presentation.

This is a relatively easy way to get math expressions into my Google Presentation.  The downside is that the expressions are images, thus not interactive.  If you need to make a change you will need to go back to the equation editor and create a new one.  But this is a relatively easy, and free, way for students to get math symbols in their Google Presentations.

3 thoughts on “Equation Editor in Google Presentation”

  1. The Daum Equation Editor is good, to be sure, but it’s limited to the Chrome browser. Many teachers already own MathType, and MathType actually works better with Google Drive Presentations. We have instructions on how to use MathType with Google Drive. The section on Presentations will produce the best-looking equations, but you can also follow the top section on Google Drive Docs for an easier solution. If you follow that process, it’s easier for sure, but if you enlarge the equation it gets fuzzy fast. http://www.dessci.com/en/products/MathType/works_with.asp#!target=google_drive

    1. Yes, that’s correct. Google didn’t build this capability into their Presentations app. However, your question prompted me to do some more fiddling with it, and I think I have a decent solution now. Check out the presentation at https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1B76JuwxywtO8jf9Nx5sD5bB63ZidpyCSteJ3OyNqIDo/edit?usp=sharing. All equations were copy & paste from MathType. The first 2 equations were pasted from MathType, but required re-sizing in Presentations. The last one is a simple copy & paste from MathType, with nothing done except moving it into position. (There’s no such thing as an “inline equation” in Google Presentations.) Email me at support@dessci.com if you want to know how to do that with copy & paste.

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